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Refresh Your Black Truffle Game With These Recipes From Casa Nonna

Refresh Your Black Truffle Game With These Recipes From Casa Nonna


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There's pretty much a truffle for every season, and thankfully you still have some time to enjoy the black winter truffle. However, oftentimes people reuse the same recipe over and over, and may get a little bored shaving them over omelettes and mac-and-cheese. If that's the case, here are some inspired ways to use those luxurious morsels in the kitchen — from expert chefs at Manhattan's Casa Nonna.

event_location=###contact_name=###contact_phone=###contact_email=Photo Courtesy of Casa Nonna

Ricotta Gnocchi

Ingredients:

Per Order:

  • 6 ounces ricotta gnocchi
  • 1 ½ ounces porcini purée
  • 2 ounces porcini, sliced
  • ½ ounce truffle purée
  • 1 ounce white wine
  • ¼ ounce garlic, sliced
  • 1 ounce chicken stock

Gnocchi:

  • 5 pounds ricotta impastata
  • 1 ½ pounds "00" pasta flour
  • 1 cup Panko breadcrumbs
  • 1 cup pecorino, Grated
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 20 grams salt (about 4 teaspoons)

Directions:

In a mixing bowl fitted with the paddle, whip the ricotta for 15 minutes on medium high.

Add the pecorino and beat for five minutes. Add the eggs, olive oil and salt, and mix until well incorporated. Add the flour, mix until just incorporated (about one minute). Do not over mix.

Wrap the dough in plastic, refrigerate overnight (no less than six hours).

Photo Courtesy of Casa Nonna

Tajarin al Tartufo

Ingredients:

Per Order:

  • 6 ounces tajarin (tagliatelle)
  • 3 ounces truffle butter
  • 2 ounces parmesan cheese
  • ¼ ounce truffle salsa

Pasta:

  • 2 pounds "00" pasta flour
  • 2 cups egg yolks
  • 2 tablespoons truffle oil
  • 2 tablespoons salt

Directions:

In a mixing bowl, add the flour and salt. Add the egg yolks, then the truffle oil. Knead the dough for 20 minutes.

Wrap dough with plastic wrap, let it rest for one hour before rolling.

Chocolate Truffles With Truffle Scent

Ingredients:

  • 4 pounds semi-sweet chocolate
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • 2 cups melted chocolate (1 pound chocolate + ½ cup heavy cream)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh truffle
  • 3 tablespoons truffle oil
  • 2 cups cocoa powder

Directions:

In a saucepan, mix together heavy cream, honey and shaved truffles. Bring to a boil, set aside to steep for 15 minutes.

Melt the chocolate into the cream, whisking vigorously. Add the truffle oil, mix well. Place the chocolate in the refrigerator until firm.

Using a melon baller, scoop out the chocolate and roll into the melted chocolate (chocolate should be at room temperature, otherwise the chocolate balls will melt). Set aside until the chocolate hardens, then roll the truffles in the cocoa powder.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


Lostpastremembered

Make a simple syrup… heat the sugar and water and add lemon and peel (and ginger if you are doing it that way). Let cool for 2 hours, strain and add ginger essential oil and freeze. Add the rum and stir just before serving.

Just before serving, add some of the sparkling wine, lemon ice mixture (at a proportion of 1 lemon ice/wine (that is 1 lemon-6 wine) to 3 meringue—enough to give it the texture of soft whipped cream. I would say 3 T meringue is enough per glass

Whip the whites and add the sifted sugar slowly until a good stiff meringue is formed. Add a little of the wine mixture to flavor it but it will not take as much… less than 1-4.

OR, mix it all together in a punch bowl and serve!

Just for the heck of it… here is some of the first class china on the Titanic, lovely, isn’t it? The glass and plate that I used are of the same vintage, around 1910.


48 comments:

Lovely post with lots of interesting bits I never knew. I agree the titanic was very definately short on wine for a 5 day cruise. Maybe the wine merchants knew something that the crew didn't!! Diane

My mother-in-law used to make punch whenever she had a party. This sounds like a delicious recipe - so elegant. What an interesting post, too! The quantities of meat and fish that were on board are incredible! Perhaps instead of wine they drank more mixed cocktails at that time..and punch!

I just found your Blog and I'm now following it. can't wait to read your other threads.
Thanks for sharing. have a great weekend!

What, a fountain of information. and somehow you make it sound so romantic, he he, I just love reading your post.
Hugs,
Margaret B

FoodFun>I never thought of it that way. it's just that everything else was so excessive. 1500 for 5 days. not really a lot!
Savoring> I do think punch deserves a renaissance. especially in summer. As for the bottles. maybe only first class drank a lot. there were at least 5 different wines at dinner for the 416 in first class. Although I did read that glasses were never more than 2/3 full to make them less prone to spillage.
Erica>Thanks for stopping by, I do hope you enjoy them!
TheFrench Bear> what is more romantic than a doomed cruise? Glad you enjoyed it!

Hey Deana, I always wonder about the moments before anything like the Titanic disaster. The moments where everyone is just going about their business and lives not knowing what is coming. very unsettling.
On a pleasant note, this lemon drink sounds so wonderful. And you've again caught that beautiful, romantic light in your photo of the drink. Very enchanting.

Stella> I was particularly pleased with these. I worked really hard to make the B&W photos look 100 years old. I looked at 19th c photos to get some ideas and then went for it. One of these days I am going to do some cyanotypes and albumen prints with a pin hole camera. I am just crazy about really ancient photos from the 1840's. They are really like impressionist art. think Fox-Talbot.

What an interesting post. The china is gorgeous!

I'd never heard of a saccharometer. but I guess it shouldn't be a surprise there is such a thing. It reminded me of a refractometer which I think it used with grapes, isn't it? Detects solids or something. You'd know, but I'd have to look it up!

I've always been fascinated with the food aboard the Titanic. What fun to have found the book Last Dinner on the Titanic. I'd love to read it. You always discover the most fascinating books!
The china is divine.

And yes, after looking at the ingredients, The Punch Romaine might just have been used as a palate cleanser. The photos make it look like a heavenly cloud of something delicious. What could possibly be wrong with lemon, meringue and champagne? I'm licking my lips already!

Your posts are so interesting and informative and, of course, beautiful to look at!

Interesting post, love reading about the information on The Titanic - not to mention the lovely china which is my weakness.

Hello you fabulous creature! I've been lurking about the past few posts, so super stupidly busy and sick at once, I have been drooling, esp. over the chocolate cream pie! Fabulous job darling!

Absolutely stunning china! I enjoyed the lesson in history.

I had no idea there was so much food on the Titanic! Very interesting information. Your pictures are stunning! This sounds like a very refreshing punch.

Gail> Thanks for stopping by. there is a great ghostly photo of the china on the ocean floor. this must have been left behind. it is lovely!
Barbara> It is very cloudlike. well put. I think this is a brilliant combo. I made it for friends over Memorial Day and it was a huge hit. we had it between dinner and dessert. As for the book.. click and buy. it is really fun. Dr. Lostpast thinks it's macabre to be curious about life aboard the dead ship, doesn't understand the fuss. I think it is the last gasp of an age. After WWI it would all be gone. 2500 crew for 1000 passengers. That is another world.
Pam>Thanks so much. This was fun to do and I learned some cool things.
Shirley>Thanks for stopping by. old china is my weakness too!
Divina>That was quite a compliment. I am thrilled! So pleased you enjoyed it!
Butteryum>It is pretty, isn't it.. I think they are redoing it!
Faith>SOOO much food, crazy, right? Glad you liked my antique pics!

Am I wrong to think that this recipe would be a modern day Orange Julius with alcohol?

You continue to amaze and enlighten me with your bits of history. Reading about the Titanic usually brings me nightmares, but I'll try to focus on the food this time. LOL

I have that book, Deana! Years ago I hosted my dinner club and we made 5 courses from the last dinner on the Titanic. It was painstaking. But fun. We didn't make this drink and it sounds yummy.

What an amazing drink! I love the meringue on top!

I really love to visit here. I always learn something new and I am fascinated by the ease with which you write and make history interesting. I hope you are having a wonderful day. Blessings. Mary

That is definitely an Escoffier-like number of steps for a dish! I would really really love to peruse your book collection someday. I can't imagine a better title than "Cooling Cups." How cool that you did this - I LOVE this post.

It's a exquisite punch. The combination of lemon ice, sparkling wine and meringue seems to me to be delicious.
It is perfect for a sweet, sweet end.

Again Deana, this is why I LOVE your site! You know I'm one of those people that did wonder what their last meal was! :P Your version looks absolutely last meal worthy! :D

Hey guys, I forgot to put the menu on. OOOPS!!

Mags> sort of, yes! a lemon julius! And yes. they were having a really good time until Sunday night!
Allourfingers> It is a cool book, isn't it? It sort of gives instructions on doing a Titanic party which is neat. I can't imagine the work involved in doing it.. I hope everyone did a dish!
5 star> the meringue is very sexy!
Mary> so glad you enjoy my mini history lessons!
Trix> i just had to add a note.. if you buy sorbet it's a breeze! The drink books are too much fun. go ahead. buy one! The formula was sooo similar for about 1/2 the drinks with lemon, champagne and rum or cognac. interesting.
Gemma> I'm glad you like it. I can imagine drinking this on a hot day in Barcelona!
Lorraine> I did too! Isn't it funny what foodies think about. it was a disaster after all. On the other hand, it's better to concentrate on the positive. They were having a great time!

Oh dearest, what a fabulous way to tie together cuisine and history. You have really found a magnificent way to whet our appetites and our curiosity! Have you ever gone as far back as Roman times and what they ate? That would be really interesting. Thank you for coming to my post it really means a lot to me when people articulate their understanding of what I am trying to communicate! MERCI MILLE FOIS! Anita

The tragedy of the titanic always fascinated me you are bringing it back to life with the interesting facts that I ignored about their food pantry and menu and the china they used unbelievable!
Love that cocktail too! sounds so ethereal.

congratulations that must be terrific!! PIerre

Castles&crowns>History is more interesting with food! And yes, I have Apicius' cookbook and look forward to sharing it with you all soon. The recipes are delicious. a little odd sometimes, but delicious!
Des>thanks Des, you know from interesting.. people should stop by your blog and check it out.
taste of beirut>ethereal is a good word for the drink. light lemony air!
pierre> yup. it is nummy good!

Thanks for the blog visit. I love your blog's unique blend of history and food. I cannot wait to come back!

I love uncooked meringue . sounds like heaven in a drink!

This reminds me a bit of syllabub which uses lemons, sherry and cream - once you mix it and let it sit in the refrigerator for a while, it develops that frothy layer on top. I'd love to try your recipe. Amazed at the volume of food they brought along. Some airplanes don't even serve food now .

Lovely drink and lovely post..thanks for lovely comment on my blog too..glad your dog likes my fav.tunes..lol..he or she must had an Indian heart. -)))

Another very interesting and well-written post.

I cannot believe the amount of food they had on the ship! Incredible that they were able to keep it in good condition and serve it. The ingredients. Squab, filet mignon, absolutely luxurious!

This looks truly amazing. I agree completely that the food to wine ratio was ridiculous! No one needs that many potatoes on one ship, I'd think but one always needs a fine wine!

What a fascinating post! Thank you! I will try this at our next dinner party.

Fascinating post. THanks so much for researching this and sharing with the rest of us. Beautiful post!

hungryscholar>welcome anytime!
Becky>i think you will love it!
TW> after researching syllabub. it is much like it and a cousin, I would say. very refreshing.
Jagruti>My St.Bernard is an old soul. perhaps she spent some time in India! PS I love indian classical music!
Lazar> Thanks. it was a fun one to do!
Fresh>Me too! Could it be they laid in stores for the trip back too.
Plutonia> thanks for the visit. yeah. lots of potatoes. maybe that was what the crew ate!
Sue> that mavasia was really the key. made some with proseco and it was good.. just not as good!
El> thanks for stopping. most welcome!

great post, so much interesting facts, so much food oh my, I never knew..and seeing the menus how wonderful, I really enjoyed your post and the remake is just divine, great post again..

What a spectacular post. Its a beautiful drink, but it also makes me feel slightly sad, because of the tragedy associated with it. It is kind of shocking to see that picture of the plates on the bottom of the sea bed.
*kisses* HH

Hi Deanna! Thank you for coming to bid me bon voyage! You are sooo kind to do so I am very excited to go see loved ones in San Francisco and then down to L.A. where I was born. Ah. I am loving the idea of getting on a plane early tomorrow morning! HAVE A GREAT WEEK and I will be back in 10 days! Anita

What a cool post! No one was going hungry on that ship, that's for sure!

I can't believe how many components that punch romaine has. sounds delicious!

*loved* your black and white photos. they really do look 100 yrs old!
and really enjoyed this read!

Hello I am so delighted I found your site, I really found you by mistake, while I was watching on yahoo for

something else, Anyways I am here now and would just like to say thank for a tremendous post and a all round

entertaining blog. Please do keep up the great work.

led tap: The New Technology The need for shower heads has sprung up with rising water shortage problems. bathroom accessories technology has evolved as many companies have understood the importance of water conservation. Companies have introduced significant changes to their showerhead technology to use less water, while giving the same water levels and quality. kitchen tap that feature the push-on mixer are best for old bathrooms, as they do not require any plumbing behind the bath tap.


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