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5 Foods You Should Be Eating in 2016

5 Foods You Should Be Eating in 2016



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Even if your New Year’s resolution was not to lose weight, you should always be taking steps to become healthier. Whether that means preparing your meals ahead of time or taking time in the beginning of the week to go grocery shopping, every little bit can get you closer to your goals.

Click here for the 50 Recipes for Your New Year’s Weight-Loss Resolution slideshow.

“This is a time of year when most of us vow to ‘be healthier’ in the next 365 days than we were in the last,” said Claire Siegel, registered dietitian with Snap Kitchen. “And while this is an admirable goal, it often falls by the wayside in the months to come. We forget, lose steam, or just get bored. When it comes to staying interested in new healthy habits, what we put on our plates at each meal can make or break our enthusiasm. Keep your taste buds and determination fired up with these fun, nutritious pieces of winter produce!” We spoke with Siegel about the five foods you should grab next time you are at the grocery store.

Beets
“Packed with folate, manganese, potassium, and antioxidants, the jewel-colored veggie is anti-inflammatory and detoxifying,” Siegel said. “Their buttery texture and slightly sweet flavor makes them the perfect addition to any main course or salad when served steamed or roasted.”

Fennel
“With the flavor of licorice and the texture of celery, fennel makes a lovely and unique addition to many salads and side dishes,” Siegel said. “It’s especially delicious when sautéed with onions or served raw with a savory dip. Full of vitamin C, fiber, and potassium, you’ll want to incorporate it into your 2016 diet.”

Kabocha Squash
“Like all winter squash, kabocha is packed with carotenoids and vitamin A for eye health, plus vitamin C, fiber, and many other vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants,” Siegel said. “This little green pumpkin is unique in that you can eat the skin that covers the sweet orange flesh. Keep your eye out for kabocha at your local grocery, as they’re exclusively harvested in the winter months!”

Persimmon
“Once perfectly ripened, this fruit makes a deliciously sweet addition to your new year,” Siegel said. “The oblong, astringent hachiya variety should be eaten, perhaps sliced up like an apple as a snack, while still firm. The squat, non-astringent kaki type should be allowed to soften and can then be eaten like a custard with a spoon.”

Pomegranate
“One of the oldest plants on earth, and a symbol of good luck in some cultures,” Siegel said. “The juicy arils, or seeds, inside this spherical fruit pack a ton of heart-healthy antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds. For easy removal, try separating the seeds from the flesh in a bowl of cold water.”

The accompanying slideshow is provided by special contributor Olivia Giordano.


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!


5 foods you should never eat just before going to bed

Healthy sleep is trending and, as odd as it may sound, finding ways to sleep more efficiently is one of the latest crazes in the world of health and fitness. There are unusual beverages that can help you fall asleep and there are even a bunch of snacks you can eat before bed in order to help you build muscle. And, while everyone knows that caffeine before bed doesn’t equate to a great night’s rest, it’s possible that you are not aware of the many foods that aren’t great to have before bed.

“Typically, snacking at night is not caused by hunger but, rather, boredom,” says Rene Ficek, a registered dietitian and the lead nutrition expert at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating.

“Additionally, the types of food that are snacked on are usually high-calorie, indulgent food items like ice cream, cake, and chips. Combine these two factors and it is very likely that the snacker is overconsuming total daily calories, thus resulting in weight gain.”

But it isn’t just your waistline you need to worry about when eating before bed.

“I advise against snacking near bed[time] for reasons beyond the obvious (like weight gain),” says Alyssa Cellini, nutritionist and co-founder of My Custom Cleanse, “because of the effects it has on sleep and future diabetes risk. Sleep quality is highly affected by your circadian rhythm, so offsetting your insulin/cortisol in the night may cause you to toss and turn — or even hit snooze on your alarm in the morning. Diabetes is caused by high blood sugar swings and especially high insulin levels in the blood. So, pasta for lunch or two cookies near bed may have very different calories, but both elevate your insulin to the same point in your blood — overwhelming your cells and getting you one step closer to diabetes.”

If eating before bed can be so detrimental to one’s weight and health, what is the cut-off point? When should we stop consuming the foods in the accompanying slideshow?

“A great rule of thumb is two hours [before bed],” advises Ana Goldseker, director of nutrition for Nava Health and Vitality Centers. “The body should have ample time to properly digest its last meal before going horizontal. You want the body to be resting at night, not digesting. Better yet, review your last meal and figure out why it wasn't satisfying. If you can take nighttime snacking out of the equation, even better!”

In addition to our 21 Sleep Hacks to Rest Your Way to a Better Body and Better Health, we urge you to avoid the following caffeine-containing, sugary, high-carb snacks before bed.

Even some of the healthier options from our list of 9 Healthiest Breakfast Cereals to Enjoy and 6 Unhealthy Options to Avoid at All Costs are on the bedtime-snacking naughty list. Why? Even the healthy boxed cereals contain carbs, and, while they may not be as unhealthy as these 10 Breakfast Cereals That Have as Much Sugar as Candy, any carbohydrate should be approached with caution before bed time. Carbs, especially sugars, can inspire a blood sugar spike while your body is winding down at night, often resulting in undesirable weight gain.

Red meat — a carnivore’s best friend and the bane of every vegan’s existence. While the nation is torn between loving and hating red meat (decide for yourself after reading 7 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Eat Red Meat — and 8 Reasons Why You Should), one piece of advice we should all take seriously is that eating a burger before bed isn’t a recipe for peaceful sleep. In fact, burgers tend to have a high fat content and, when compared to the other macronutrients, fat is denser calorically (we’re talking nine calories per gram of fat versus four calories per gram of protein and/or carbohydrates). Fat can trigger heartburn, so if you want to avoid a restless night, tossing and turning with stomach and chest pain, say no to burgers before bed.

3. Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate can be incredibly beneficial for one’s health this isn’t breaking news. What you may not have known, however, is that cocoa naturally contains caffeine (about 12 milligrams of caffeine per ounce of chocolate). You (probably) aren’t downing a hot cup of coffee before bed, and we suggest avoiding dark chocolate as well. As wonderful as a slice of chocolate cake before bed may sound, you may want to save your amazing chocolate cake recipe for earlier in the day.

Remember how sugary cereals were a nighttime no-no? Well, as tempting as a cup or cone from one of the world’s 30 best ice cream parlors may sound on your late evening walk home from the boardwalk or park, you better make sure you have ample time to digest its high sugar content before sleeping your sleep can be disturbed as your body attempts to process large amounts of sugar consumed directly before bed. Also, many popular ice cream brands contain dark chocolate. Pop quiz: Are you supposed to eat dark chocolate before bed? Answer: No!