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Malt-Beer-Brined Turkey with Malt Glaze

Malt-Beer-Brined Turkey with Malt Glaze


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Ingredients

Glaze

  • 2/3 cup barley malt syrup
  • 1/4 cup malt vinegar or apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter

Brine, Turkey, and Aromatics

  • 2 cups Diamond Crystal coarse kosher salt or 1 1/2 cups Morton coarse kosher salt
  • 3 12-ounce bottles stout beer (such as Guinness)
  • 1 1/2 cups barley malt syrup
  • 2 teaspoons ground black pepper
  • 2 peeled onions, quartered
  • 2 celery stalks, cut into chunks
  • 1 unpeeled head of garlic, cut crosswise in half
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Mixed-Mushroom and Tarragon Gravy

Special Equipment

  • Charcoal chimney (if grilling)
  • 13x9x2-inch disposable aluminum baking pan (to catch drips; if grilling)

Recipe Preparation

Glaze

  • Bring malt syrup, vinegar, herbs, and pepper to boil in small saucepan, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat to low and simmer until glaze coats spoon, 4 to 5 minutes. Mix in butter. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill. Rewarm before using.

Brine, Turkey, and Aromatics

  • Pour 4 quarts water into 16-quart nonreactive bowl or pot. Add salt; stir to dissolve. Mix in beer and malt syrup. Insert 1 oven bag into second bag; place in large bowl. Rinse turkey inside and out. Slide turkey, breast side down, into doubled bag. Pour brine into bag. Press out any air; seal bags. Chill turkey in brine (still in bowl) 16 to 18 hours.

  • Remove turkey from brine. Pat very dry, inside and out, with paper towels. Sprinkle main cavity with 2 teaspoons pepper; fill with onions, celery, sage, thyme, and garlic. Close cavity with turkey lacing pins. Tuck wing tips under; brush all over with oil.

To Roast Turkey

  • Set oven rack at lowest position; preheat to 350°F. Place turkey on rack in roasting pan; add 2 cups water.

  • Roast turkey 2 hours. Brush with glaze; add water if pan is dry. Roast 30 minutes. Brush with glaze. Tent with foil if browning too quickly. Roast until thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 165°F, 30 to 45 minutes. Brush with more glaze. Transfer to platter; let rest 30 minutes (temperature will rise 5 to 10 degrees).

To Grill Turkey

  • Prepare barbecue (medium heat). Remove top grill rack. If using charcoal, light briquettes in chimney. When briquettes are covered with white ash, push to opposite sides of bottom grill rack, leaving center empty. Place disposable aluminum pan in center of rack (you will need to light additional briquettes, checking every 30 minutes during grilling time). Replace top grill rack. If using 3-burner gas grill, light burners on left and right sides, leaving center burner off. If using 2-burner gas grill, light burner on 1 side; place disposable pan over unlit side.

  • Place turkey, breast side up, on grill rack over disposable pan. Cover barbecue. Insert instant-read thermometer into hole in hood. Maintain temperature as close as possible to 350°F on charcoal grill by opening vents to increase temperature and closing vents to reduce temperature or adjusting temperature on gas grill with controls. Cook turkey 2 hours, tenting loosely with foil if browning too quickly. Brush turkey with glaze. Cover grill; cook 30 minutes longer. Brush again with glaze. Cook until thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 165°F, about 30 minutes longer. Transfer turkey to platter. Let rest 30 minutes (temperature will rise 5 to 10 degrees).

Nutritional Content

10 servings, 1 serving contains: Calories (kcal) 579.3 %Calories from Fat 42.6 Fat (g) 27.4 Saturated Fat (g) 7.7 Cholesterol (mg) 189.0 Carbohydrates (g) 13.6 Dietary Fiber (g) 0.8 Total Sugars (g) 12.2 Net Carbs (g) 12.8 Protein (g) 65.0 Sodium (mg) 631.9Reviews Section

If your turkey is frozen, you need to think about defrosting it way before it’s time to slide it in the oven. According to the National Turkey Federation, you should allow approximately 24 hours for every four to five pounds of bird weight for thawing in the refrigerator. This method is the safest and will result in the best finished product. For a 16-20 pound bird, this is 4-5 days. Unless you want your Thanksgiving to be memorable for food borne illness, resist the temptation to save time by defrosting at room temperature on your kitchen counter.

According to the USDA, turkeys to be sold fresh are quick-chilled to 40 °F or lower, but must not go below a temperature of 26 °F. Fresh turkeys should be refrigerated and used within 1 to 2 days from purchase.


Greenpoint Girls Group: Thanksgiving Potluck

Last Sunday I organized a long overdue Greenpoint Girls Group gathering. For those unfamiliar, GGG is a group of kickass ladies who come together and share happy moments chattin’ it up, swapping ideas and projects, and gossiping the way only ladies do. We all live in Greenpoint and dip our sticky hands in a variety careers, activities, and hobbies. Artists, farmers, beekeepers, ice cream makers, hair stylists, yoga teachers, puppet makers, and the like, the diverse group represented in GGG makes for one hell of a good time.

It’s been months since the get-together, which involved dinner at Paulie Gee‘s and dancing afterward at No Lights No Lycra. For this edition Thanksgiving was around the corner and what more fun to share thanks and food than a potluck. The ever so lovely hostess Lauren opened her cozy sweet apartment and twenty or so of us gathered around, talking and eating our brains out.

I felt obligated and impelled to roast a turkey and accompany it with a side and dessert. I looked no further than the November issue of Bon Appetit to find the perfect recipe to use for the dinner. I’ve roasted a turkey once before and don’t remember much other than it tasted pretty good. Flipping through the turkey recipes one immediately caught my attention, that of Malt-Beer-Brined Turkey with Malt Glaze. Sounds crazy doesn’t it? I was skeptical of malt as I didn’t really even know what it was and what store could carry such a rare product. For convenience purposes I live in a city with bountiful resources and didn’t have to go far to find barley malt syrup at Whole Foods. I paired the dish with Wild Rice Stuffing, Mushroom Tarragon Gravy, Cranberry-Orange Chutney and Vanilla Spiced Caramel Pear Tart.

I followed the Turkey recipe to a T and had a minor anxiety attack when Lauren’s oven temperature reader wasn’t doing its job and I swore in 30 minutes I thought I burned the skin. Turns out temp meter was fine and 3 hours later the turkey was juicy and cooked to perfection. The skin was sticky and chewy, sweet with malt and beer. A pastry chef at the dinner first complimented me for having made 1 of 3 best turkeys she’s ever had and then later told me it was actually THE best turkey she ever had. BLUSH! I was surprised myself that it came out as good as it did considering I didn’t quite know what I was doing, I guess that’s what recipes are for.

The wild rice stuffing wasn’t as popular, the wild rice probably could have used a bit more cooking but the pine nuts add a nice savory touch to the dish and a slightly crunchy texture that compliments the chew of the turkey. The mushroom gravy was standard and the cranberry chutney with orange peels and serrano pepper was probably the best (and only) chutney I’ve ever made. I learned that cranberries don’t actually have pits as I thought they did and imagined the nuisance of pitting it all before or after cooking.

The pear tart I’m not so proud about since it’s not a homemade crust, it’s puff pastry that I was required to purchase. I’d like to know why puff pastries are usually frozen and store bought and rarely attempted to be made from scratch in most recipes. The pears were underripe and the finish product was difficult to split and slice since giant half pears were sprawled belly up between the puffs. Not to mention one side was completely burnt. Fail.

Folks brought an amazing medley of veggies and starchy goods with mac n’ cheese, brussel sprouts, carrots, sweet potatoes, beets and the like. The dessert table was teeming with goodness with pear tart (a much yummier version than mine), chocolate bark, caramel popcorn and more. I was so full by the end and so ready to take a nap.

The drink of the evening was warm apple cider rum punch. I watched with admiration as Ruth poked an orange and stuck on whole cloves, voodoo doll style, and let the cider and juice seep out with clovey hints. It was divine.

It’s a relief to think I don’t have to do this again tomorrow, just make apple cake and join the fam and call it a day. I’ve made a traditional Thanksgiving dinner for the family once and never again will I labor over an All-American dinner when all they request is some rice and kimchi. I’m looking forward to next year though, getting the ladies together again and feeling all home and family nestled together like little chirping birds.


3. Beer Brined Turkey The Beeroness


Best Beer Brine Turkey
from Beer Brined Turkey The Beeroness
. Source Image: thebeeroness.com. Visit this site for details: thebeeroness.com

We like making our turkey gravy just before we eat, however you can make it ahead. Just cozy it up right prior to dinner, including a little extra supply if required.


Bone-in turkey breasts are easy to find, and as impressive as a whole bird when you roast them in butter and herbs.

You’ll want to make extra of this lemon-herb butter it goes well with chicken and fish, too.

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VIDEO: How to carve a turkey

Those of us who fret about creating turkey slices that don't crumble should thank our lucky stars we're not slicing Peking duck, which requires a precise 84 pieces. Still, if you haven't cut the big bird in a while, or have never done it before, it can be a daunting task. First, wear an apron. Next, follow the directions graciously offered by two local purveyors: Text is from Publix supermarkets, and the demonstration is from Chef Illansy Ruiz of Whole Foods Market at Mercato. Both offer turkey dinners to go and are baking and roasting overtime today.

1. When your turkey is done, remove it from the oven, cover with foil, and let it sit for 15 to 2O minutes before placing on a clean cutting surface.

2. Separate the drumsticks from the thighs by holding the tip of each drumstick and cutting through the joint where it meets the thighbone.

3. Hold each drumstick by the tip, restlng the larger ends on the cutting board. Slice parallel to the bones until all meat is sliced.

4. Make a deep horizontal cut into the breast meat just above the wing.

5. From the outer top edge of each breast, continue to slice from the top down to the horizontal cut made during the previous step.

6. Repeat steps 4-5 on the other side.

7. Remove wings by cutting through the joints where the wing bones and backbone meet.

Make sure the turkey you're slicing is delectable all the way through. Here are a number of recipes from this year's food publications that promise to up the flavor ante of Thanksgiving Day. These are recipes for an entire turkey or for a turkey breast. For quicker cooking time, consider buying a butterflied turkey.

Roasted turkey with smoked paprika

Ingredients

2 tablespoons Italian seasoning

2 tablespoons Sicilian sea salt

1 tablespoon coarse grind black pepper

1 tablespoon smoked paprika

2 teaspoons garlic powder

2 teaspoons ground mustard

1 whole turkey (12 to 14 pounds) fresh or frozen, thawed

Preparation

Preheat oven to 325 degrees

Mix first six ingredients.

Place turkey, breast side up, on roasting rack in shallow roasting pan.

Sprinkle one tablespoon of the spice mixture inside turkey.

Stuff with celery, onion, orange and bay leaves.

Brush turkey lightly with oil.

Spread remaining spice mixture over entire surface and under skin of turkey.

Add ½ cup water to pan and cover loosely with heavy duty foil.

Roast for one hour, remove foil and roast 2 to 2½ hours longer, or until internal temperature reaches 165 to 175 degrees in thigh, while basting occasionally with pan juices.

Remove turkey from oven and let stand 20 minutes.

Transfer to serving platter.

Reserve pan juices to make gravy or to serve with turkey.

? From mccormickgorumet.com

Malt-beer brined turkey with malt glaze

Roasted Turkey:

Prep time, 45 minutes total 20 hours (includes brining and roasting time)

Grilled Turkey: Prep time, 45 minutes total 21 hours (includes brining and grilling time)

Ingredients

¼ cup malt vinegar or apple cider vinegar

½ teaspoon ground black pepper

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Brine, turkey and aromatics

2 cups coarse Diamond Crystal kosher salt or

11/2 cups Morton coarse kosher sale

3 12-ounce bottles stout beer (such as Guinness)

1½ cups barley malt syrup (Barley malt syrup has a flavor similar to molasses. Look for it at natural food stores or buy it from edenfoods.com.)

2 teaspoons ground black pepper

2 peeled onions, quartered

2 celery stalks, cut into chunks

1 unpeeled head of garlic, cut crosswise in half

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Special equipment

Charcoal chimney (if grilling)

13 by 9 by 2-inch disposable aluminum baking pan (to catch drips, if grilling)

Preparation

Glaze preparation

Bring malt syrup, vinegar, herbs and pepper to boil in small saucepan, stirring occasionally.

Reduce heat to low and simmer until glaze coats spoon, 4 to 5 minutes then mix in butter. This can be done one day ahead if you cover and chill and then warm before using.

Brine, turkey and aromatics

Pour four quarts water into 16-quart nonreactive bowl or pot.

Add salt stir to dissolve and mix in beer and malt syrup.

Insert one oven bag into second bag and place in large bowl.

Rinse turkey inside and out and slide turkey, breast side down, into doubled bag.

Pour brine into bag and press out any air and seal bags.

Chill turkey in brine (still in bowl) 16 to 18 hours.

Remove turkey from brine, pat very dry, inside and out, with paper towels.

Sprinkle main cavity with two teaspoons pepper and fill with onions, celery, sage thyme and garlic.

Close cavity with turkey lacing pins and tuck wing tips under and brush all over with oil.

Set oven rack at lowest position and preheat to 350 degrees.

Place turkey on rack in roasting pan and add two cups water.

Brush with glaze and add water if pan is dry.

Roast another 30 minutes and brush with glaze.

Tent with foil if browning too quickly andr oast until thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 165 for 30 to 45 minutes.

Brush with more glaze and transfer to platter.

Let rest 30 minutes (temperature will rise 5 to10 degrees) before carving.

Using a grill

Prepare barbecue to medium heat and remove top grill rack. If using charcoal, light briquettes in chimney. When briquettes are covered with white ash, push to opposite sides of bottom grill rack, leaving center empty.

n Place disposable aluminum pan in center of rack (you will need to light additional briquettes, checking every 30 minutes during grilling time). Replace top grill rack. If using three burner gas grill, light burners on left and right sides, leaving center burner off. If using two-burner gas grill, light burner on one side place disposable pan over unlit side.

Place turkey, breast side up, on grill rack over disposable pan.

Cover barbecue and insert instant-read thermometer into hole in hood. Maintain temperature as close as possible to 350 on charcoal grill by opening vents to increase temperature and closing vents to reduce temperature or adjusting temperature on gas grill with controls.

Cook turkey two hours, tenting loosely with foil if browning too quickly.

Brush turkey with glaze, and cover grill and cook for 30 minutes longer.

Brush again with glaze, and cook until thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 165, about 30 minutes longer.

Transfer turkey to platter and brush with glaze.

Let rest 30 minutes (temperature will rise 5 to 10 degrees) before carving.

? By Bruce Aidells, from Bon Appetit November 2010

Boudin-Stuffed Turkey Breast

Ingredients

4-5 pound whole skin-on boneless turkey breast, trimmed

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1 lb. pork boudin sausage, casings removed

2 tablespoons minced fresh sage

2 tablespoons minced fresh thyme

3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Preparation

Arrange turkey skin side down on cutting board.

Remove tenders and reserve for another use and Make a length-wise cut about 3/4 inch deep down middle of each breast.

Cover turkey with plastic wrap.

Using smooth side of a meat mallet, pound breast evenly to a 11/2 inch thickness.

Season turkey with salt and pepper and smear boudin over breast, leaving a 1-inch border around edges.

Beginning with one long side of the turkey breast, roll turkey into a cylinder so that the skin faces outward set aside.

Tie turkey crosswise at 1-inch intervals with eight 15-inch lengths of kitchen twine, then tie one 24-inch length of twine around length of breast to secure it. Trim excess twine with scissors.

Place stuffed turkey on a plastic wrapped baking sheet and season turkey with salt and pepper, rub with oil, sage and thyme and arrange garlic and lemon slices over turkey.

Wrap with plastic wrap chill overnight.

Unwrap turkey and remove garlic and lemon.

Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and set a rack inside baking sheet.

Transfer turkey to rack and bake, basting with butter and turning turkey every 20 minutes until an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of turkey reads 145 degrees, approximately 1 to 11/2 hours.

Increase oven heat to 500 degrees and continue cooking, turning once, until turkey is deep golden brown and an instant-read thermometer reads 150 degrees, about 10 minutes more.

Transfer turkey to a serving platter and let rest for 20 minutes.

Remove kitchen twine. To serve, slice turkey crosswise into 1-inch pieces.

'Good Eats' roast turkey

Active: 40 minutes. Total: 3 hours 25 min (plus thawing and brining)

Ingredients

1 14-to-16 pound frozen young turkey

½ cup packed light brown sugar

1 tablespoon black peppercorns

1½ teaspoons allspice berries

1½ teaspoons chopped candied ginger

1 gallon heavily iced water

Preparation

Two to three days before roasting: Begin thawing the turkey in the refrigerator or in a cooler kept at 38 degrees.

Combine vegetable stock, salt, brown sugar, peppercorns, allspice berries and candied ginger in a large stockpot over medium-high heat and stir occasionally to dissolve the solids and bring to a boil.

Remove the brine from the heat, cool to room temperature and refrigerate.

The night before or early on the day you'd like to eat: Combine the brine, water and ice in a 5-gallon bucket.

Place thawed turkey (with innards removed) breast-side down in the brine. If necessary, weigh down the bird to ensure it is fully immersed. Cover and refrigerate or set in a cool area for 8 to 16 hours, turning the turkey once halfway through brining.

Preheat oven to 500 degrees.

Remove bird from the brine and rinse inside and out with cold water and discard the brine.

Place the bird on a roasting rack inside a half sheet pan and pat dry with paper towels.

Combine the apple, onion, cinnamon stick and one cup of water in a microwave-safe dish and microwave on high for five minutes.

Take out of the microwave and add the steeped aromatics to the turkey's cavity along with the rosemary and sage. Tuck the wings underneath the bird and coat the skin liberally with Canola oil.

Roast the turkey on the lowest level of the oven at 500 for 30 minutes.

Insert a probe thermometer into the thickest part of the breast and reduce oven temperature to 350. Set thermometer alarm (if available) to 161 degrees for approximately 2 to 2 1/2 hours.

Take out of the oven and let the turkey rest, loosely covered with foil or a large mixing bowl, for 15 minutes before carving.

? Alton Brown from the Food Network magazine, November 2010


Monday, November 8, 2010

How to Fight/Prevent Breakouts

I've had a very long obsession with pimples. I had mild acne when I was in highschool, which I was able to cure with Proactiv, which worked for about a year and never worked for me again. In college, I had a ginormous breakout sometime towards the end of sophmore year into junior year. It was pretty bad, I had cystic acne that really hurt, pretty much all over my t-zone area, especially on the forehead and inner cheek (the worst ones were at the bridge of your nose, in between the eyes). After I had gotten the acne under control it left me with scars all over my face. It's a horrible experience to go through, emotionally and physically. The reason why I am obsessed with acne is not so much the pimples as it is the after-effects and the scarring. The smallest blemish will leave a scar for months.

I'm not a dermatologist, haven't had any technical/scientific training in skin, nor am I an expert, but I do know what works for me and hopefully what will work for other people experiencing the same thing.

To get rid of cystic acne, or any other type of acne, one should really consult his/her dermatologist, as there are so many options available today, and everyone's condition is really unique. For me, I took oral antibiotics and used topical creams prescribed by my dermatologist. I no longer suffer from acne, but I do get an occasional pimple, which I attack at the first sight. I check my skin at night and also the morning to see if anything is starting to form (I know kinda crazy) and depending on what stage the pimple is in and the time of day, I use different active ingredients to fight it. I alternate between salicylic acid, sulfur, and benzoyl peroxide as a last resort, since benzoyl peroxide isn't as effective for me as the other two. If I see something beginning to form in the morning, I will use a salicylic acid gel (I use Clean & Clear's Advantage Acne Spot Treatment, it comes in silver and purple packaging) before I apply my moisturizer and sunscreen. I think sulfur is actually more effective, but since sulfur does smell funny, I only use it at night. If I see a pimple starting to form at night I will use my DDF Sulfur Mask as a spot treatment (this mask is really great, not only in killing the bacteria that forms pimples, but also purges and tightens the pores). If in the next 8-12 hours, I see that the pimple is still there, I switch to the other active ingredient, and if that doesn't work I'll use a benzoyl peroxide cream (Neutrogena on the spot acne treatment). I would say this method works for me 95% of the time, and the other 5% of the time I will end up suffering through the entire cycle of the pimple.

Not only do I do spot treatments, but I also take preventative measures in my normal skincare/makeup routine. Every night I wash my face using an oil cleanser to remove the makeup (for me I find oil cleansers to be the most effective way of removing ALL makeup, including waterproof mascaras) and follow that by using a gel cleanser that contains salicylic acid (I like the Neutrogena oil-free acne wash, the grapefruit version) which kills the bacteria on your skin. I try to exfoliate as often as my skin will allow me to, and I also make sure to wash my makeup brushes often (about once a week for brushes used in powder products). I also try to re-do my makeup when I can (as in wash off completely and redo) because I don't like to contaminate my brushes unless I start with a clean face.

I try not to conceal pimples when I have them, I think it's best to let it breathe and go through its cycle as fast as possible (this is just my feeling, no idea if it's scientifically proven), but there are occasions where you have to conceal them somehow, and usually I find that my foundation is enough to hide the redness (Guerlain Parure Gold). I also don't pick or try to pop the pimples either, as that will leave an even worse scar when everything is over.

I'm hoping I don't sound like a complete maniac or that my theories and practices are not too OCD. I remember what it's like to have scars and frankly I'm a little traumatized, so I do what I can to prevent going through that experience again. I realize that normal people probably don't study their pores every night, but if you find something in its early stages, alot of times you can prevent them, and that really applies to alot of things in life, including pimples.


Beer Can Turkey Recipes

  • Beer Turkey Chili

Use a food processor to make short work of chopping the sweet pepper and on .

Beer Braised Turkey Tacos

Stout beer and barley malt syrup add a richness to the brine, which infuses .

Allegra McEvedy uses a selection of beers to boost the flavour of her stuff .

Looking for a delicious dinner Then check out this roast turkey recipe.

Brush a beer and butter mixture on turkey for a tender and flavorful taste .

This chili has some kick to it! I love lots of veggies and flavor together. .

Beer-Braised Turkey Tacos - The Huffington Post

Pete's 'cut Up' Beer Brined Apple Smoked Turkey

Cooking Channel serves up this Beer-Brined Grilled Turkey Wings Recipe reci .

Use a food processor to make short work of chopping the sweet pepper and on .

This dish is a spin on the popular 'beer can chicken' that many folks cook .

Beer Can Jerk Turkey - A Recipe from Food Network Canada. Get the recipe of .

Skinless turkey thighs and drumsticks are packed with flavor they're a .

Beer-Braised Turkey Tacos, Recipe

Food Network invites you to try this Beer-Brined Grilled Turkey Wings recip .

Find and rate low calorie, healthy recipes at SparkRecipes. Plus use our fr .

Cooking Channel serves up this Beer Can Turkey Recipe recipe plus many othe .

Didn't see a recipe on here for doing a turkey, beer-can-style, so I did a .

In small bowl mix well the flour, baking pwdr, salt and pepper. Stir in bee .

Arrange turkey in baking dish. Mix barbeque sauce, beer, salt and pepper. P .


Monday, November 8, 2010

How to Fight/Prevent Breakouts

I've had a very long obsession with pimples. I had mild acne when I was in highschool, which I was able to cure with Proactiv, which worked for about a year and never worked for me again. In college, I had a ginormous breakout sometime towards the end of sophmore year into junior year. It was pretty bad, I had cystic acne that really hurt, pretty much all over my t-zone area, especially on the forehead and inner cheek (the worst ones were at the bridge of your nose, in between the eyes). After I had gotten the acne under control it left me with scars all over my face. It's a horrible experience to go through, emotionally and physically. The reason why I am obsessed with acne is not so much the pimples as it is the after-effects and the scarring. The smallest blemish will leave a scar for months.

I'm not a dermatologist, haven't had any technical/scientific training in skin, nor am I an expert, but I do know what works for me and hopefully what will work for other people experiencing the same thing.

To get rid of cystic acne, or any other type of acne, one should really consult his/her dermatologist, as there are so many options available today, and everyone's condition is really unique. For me, I took oral antibiotics and used topical creams prescribed by my dermatologist. I no longer suffer from acne, but I do get an occasional pimple, which I attack at the first sight. I check my skin at night and also the morning to see if anything is starting to form (I know kinda crazy) and depending on what stage the pimple is in and the time of day, I use different active ingredients to fight it. I alternate between salicylic acid, sulfur, and benzoyl peroxide as a last resort, since benzoyl peroxide isn't as effective for me as the other two. If I see something beginning to form in the morning, I will use a salicylic acid gel (I use Clean & Clear's Advantage Acne Spot Treatment, it comes in silver and purple packaging) before I apply my moisturizer and sunscreen. I think sulfur is actually more effective, but since sulfur does smell funny, I only use it at night. If I see a pimple starting to form at night I will use my DDF Sulfur Mask as a spot treatment (this mask is really great, not only in killing the bacteria that forms pimples, but also purges and tightens the pores). If in the next 8-12 hours, I see that the pimple is still there, I switch to the other active ingredient, and if that doesn't work I'll use a benzoyl peroxide cream (Neutrogena on the spot acne treatment). I would say this method works for me 95% of the time, and the other 5% of the time I will end up suffering through the entire cycle of the pimple.

Not only do I do spot treatments, but I also take preventative measures in my normal skincare/makeup routine. Every night I wash my face using an oil cleanser to remove the makeup (for me I find oil cleansers to be the most effective way of removing ALL makeup, including waterproof mascaras) and follow that by using a gel cleanser that contains salicylic acid (I like the Neutrogena oil-free acne wash, the grapefruit version) which kills the bacteria on your skin. I try to exfoliate as often as my skin will allow me to, and I also make sure to wash my makeup brushes often (about once a week for brushes used in powder products). I also try to re-do my makeup when I can (as in wash off completely and redo) because I don't like to contaminate my brushes unless I start with a clean face.

I try not to conceal pimples when I have them, I think it's best to let it breathe and go through its cycle as fast as possible (this is just my feeling, no idea if it's scientifically proven), but there are occasions where you have to conceal them somehow, and usually I find that my foundation is enough to hide the redness (Guerlain Parure Gold). I also don't pick or try to pop the pimples either, as that will leave an even worse scar when everything is over.

I'm hoping I don't sound like a complete maniac or that my theories and practices are not too OCD. I remember what it's like to have scars and frankly I'm a little traumatized, so I do what I can to prevent going through that experience again. I realize that normal people probably don't study their pores every night, but if you find something in its early stages, alot of times you can prevent them, and that really applies to alot of things in life, including pimples.


Friday, August 6, 2010

Southwestern Cobb Salad


This is an awesome salad we adapted from the July Cooking Light. You can pretty much put whatever you want in the salad, but the dressing is the amazing part. I used turkey bacon thinking it would be "healthier". Subsequently, I read an article discussing that there isn't much difference in nutrition between turkey and pork bacon. In a nutshell, one ounce of turkey bacon has 107 calories per serving, 8 grams of fat, and a 640 mg of sodium. In contrast, pork bacon has 149 calories, 11 g of fat, and 680 mg of sodium. (Granted this will all differ by the actual product you buy). Now knowing that the difference isn't that substantial, I probably would have splurged on the real bacon. it just tastes and crumbles better! (and this recipe doesn't use all that much). We had the leftovers for lunch the next day and they were just as delicious as the dinner. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

Dressing-
3 T white balsamic vinegar
1 t honey
3/4 t ground cumin
1/2 t smoked paprika
1/2 t garlic powder
1/4 t ground red pepper
2 T canola oil

Salad-
3 slices center cut bacon
cooking spray
2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, coated in cooking spray, S&P and grilled 8 min per side
8 cups chopped romaine lettuce
1/2 c pico de gallo- we just used chopped farmers market tomato
1/2 c diced avocado
1/2 c crumbled queso fresco
1/4 c chopped green onions
1 can low sodium organic black beans
2 eggs hard boiled and finely chopped

Directions:
To prepare the vinaigrette, combine the first six ingredients in a medium bowl, stirring with a whisk. Gradually add the oil, stirring constantly with a whisk, set aside.

Cook bacon in a non stick skillet over medium heat until crisp. Remove from pan and crumble.

Arrange 2 cups lettuce on each of 4 plates. Top each serving with about 2 t bacon, 5 T chopped chicken breast, 2 T pico de gallo, 2 T queso fresco, 1 T onions, 2 T chopped egg and 1/3 c beans. Drizzle dressing evenly over salads.


Watch the video: Malzbier. Karambolage. ARTE